Department Of Arts And Culture Eastern Cape

Department Of Arts And Culture Eastern Cape

Department Of Arts And Culture Eastern Cape, South Africa’s arts and culture are as varied as one might expect from such a diverse nation. The blend of local cultures and diverse influences make for a melting pot of creativity that never disappoints.
As custodians of South Africa’s diverse cultural, artistic and linguistic heritage, the Department of Arts and Culture aims to develop and preserve South African culture to ensure social cohesion and nation-building.
South Africa’s cultural and creative industry is a good revenue generator, and still has great potential to produce more and contribute to job creation.
The Cultural Industries Growth Strategy capitalises on the economic potential of the craft, music, film, publishing and design industries.
The Department of Arts and Culture provides support in the form of financing, management capacity, advocacy and networking, and by developing public-private partnerships and other initiatives that use culture as a tool for urban regeneration.
Worldwide, the turnover of cultural industries makes this the fifth-largest economic sector, which comprises design, the performing arts, dance, film, television, multimedia, cultural heritage, cultural tourism, visual arts, crafts, music and publishing.
The Department has entered into partnerships with significant stakeholders to map the cultural industries.
Cabinet has identified the creative and cultural industries as one of the drivers of economic growth and job creation in the implementation of the New Growth Path.
The Industrial Policy Action Plan 2 identifies the cultural industries, in particular the craft sector, music, jewellery production, clothing, leather, footwear and textiles as some of the sectors that will be subjected to focused and significant support by the State.

Department Of Arts And Culture Eastern Cape

National Arts Festival

Department of Arts and Culture is a proud sponsor of the National Arts Festival, whether you’re looking for Comedy, Theatre, Dance, Jazz or Ballet, you’ll find it in Grahamstown in July.

History Of The National Arts Festival

Grahamstown has been associated with carnivals and festivals for more than 180 years as British immigrants established the tradition of celebrating landmark anniversaries on a grand scale.
When a movement gained ground last century to erect a memorial to these pioneers it was agreed that it should be a “living” monument presenting festivals, conferences and other gatherings.
An Inaugural Festival was held in 1974 when the 1820 Settlers National Monument was officially opened, with the exception of 1975, a festival has been organised every year since then. The Festival was a project of the Grahamstown Foundation for 28 years and in 2002 became a Section 21 Company with an independent board of directors.
It however still operates out of the 1820 Settlers National Monument where it rents office space and the performance facilities.
From the beginning the programme was not confined to one venue, other facilities in the city were also used. A trend that developed as the Festival grew and today approximately 50 venues are scattered throughout the Grahamstown area.